Whittier Trust has a team of more than a dozen dedicated professionals responsible for protecting and growing all of our charitable clients. The passion these skilled matchmakers have for the philanthropic field is never more apparent than when they have the opportunity to connect Whittier Trust nonprofit endowment clients to Whittier Trust grant-making clients. Philanthropic clients often seek out the team’s expertise when looking for well-run charities that align with their goals and missions. Similarly, Whittier Trust’s nonprofit clients trust the team to help identify new qualified revenue sources. The diligent members of Pegine Grayson’s team explore all possible options and make special note when values, interests and visions for the future align between clients.

Whittier Trust Senior Vice President and Director of Philanthropic Services, Pegine Grayson, and her group never guarantee more than a personal and thoughtful introduction. However, they can offer exclusive visibility into certain nonprofit and grantmaking clients. Connecting these dots can be critical for grant making foundations and donor-advised funds that don’t publicize their efforts or existence through social media or websites. The insights and relationships the team has with their clients allows for more informed decision-making and can help save valuable time. The team is happy to provide win-win scenarios on a regular basis.

From Investments to Family Office to Trustee Services and more, we are your single-source solution.

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Whittier Trust presents an overview on how to build a family foundation that will provide a strong family legacy while maintaining continuity. This webinar offers insight on how to formalize a family foundation, the different roles each generation of your family plays, how to use grant-making as a positive training tool and other helpful best practices.

The discussion incorporated real-life scenarios to show how:

  • Philanthropy can be an excellent training ground for NextGens to learn about financial and business analysis.
  • Engaging in philanthropy can offer a safe and neutral space for young family members to demonstrate responsibility and acumen.
  • Intentional philanthropy goes beyond doing good for your community, and how it can strengthen interpersonal ties, bridge generations and build a family’s legacy.
  • After the sale of a family business, formalized philanthropy provides a reason to meet, collaborate and promote shared values.

Whittier Trust’s Ashley Fontanetta, Vice President, Philanthropic Services; Channing Grigsby, Vice President, Philanthropic Services; and David Shaw, Publishing Director, Family Business Magazine, provide an overview and best practices for NextGen philanthropy and family continuity.

Whittier Trust Company and The Whittier Trust Company of Nevada, Inc. are state-chartered trust companies, which are wholly owned by Whittier Holdings, Inc., a closely held holding company. All of said companies are referred to herein, individually and collectively, as “Whittier”. The accompanying materials are provided for informational purposes only and are not intended, and should not be construed, as investment, tax or legal advice. Please consult your own investment, legal and/or tax advisors in connection with financial decisions and before engaging in any financial transactions. These materials do not purport to be a complete statement of approaches, which may vary due to individual factors and circumstances. Although the information provided is carefully reviewed, Whittier makes no representations or warranties regarding the information provided and cannot be held responsible for any direct or incidental loss or damage resulting from applying any of the information provided. Past performance is no guarantee of future results and no investment or financial planning strategy can guarantee profit or protection against losses. These materials may not be reproduced or distributed without Whittier’s prior written consent.

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As environmental and social issues come to the forefront of the agenda of many individual investors when working with an advisor, trickling down from the shift led by large endowments and foundations, the question stands – is it profitable to make investment decisions aligned with values that will have a positive impact on our world?

Studies have shown that having a socially conscious lens toward investment can have a positive impact on portfolio performance, taking into account that organizations that highly regard social values are likely to take an ethical approach across all of their operations driving long-term profitability.

There are different approaches to building an investment portfolio that reflects a commitment to varied Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) issues such as selling stocks that are not representative of your stance on the issue (“negative screening”), or funding organizations that are driving beneficial impact in this area (“social impact investing”). As with any investment decision, individuals need to take a broad view of the overall goals and stance of their portfolios when pursuing ESG focused investing.

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As a parent, it can be challenging to find meaningful ways to integrate your children into your philanthropic efforts. Factors such as age, interests, and financial status all play into how you handle introducing your children to your family’s philanthropic goals. At Whittier Trust, we channel our years of experience into tailored solutions that help mitigate uncertainty as we address the needs that are most important to you. Over the years our Philanthropic Services team has worked with adolescents, and adult children to make sure this transitional phase is both educational and impactful.

When meeting with the next generation, it is important to set up one on one time with your children to see where their interests, and passions lie in the philanthropic sphere. After honest and comprehensive conversations, we can begin to align their interests with the causes they feel are most significant. From there, we are able to provide recommendations that best align with that vision. To begin coordinating interactions between your child and nonprofit organizations, it is crucial to set up an associate board. Oftentimes, we also find it beneficial to pair a young philanthropist with an advisor of a similar age so that they can get expertise with someone who is familiar with the social and digital platforms they are accustomed to using.

This process is deeply rewarding and can result in many long-term benefits. Through it, we educate the next generation on the charitable tools and topics that will be most useful to help them achieve their goals. Tools like grant-making become increasingly valuable during this phase, as it allows for the child to involve other members of the family and deepen the family bond around their cause. When all is said and done, our aim is to help create an individual who has the confidence, knowledge, and support to perpetuate their family’s legacy in their philanthropic endeavors. If you are unsure about where to begin this process with your child, please reach out and allow us to guide you through this exciting process.

From Investments to Family Office to Trustee Services and more, we are your single-source solution.

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Philanthropy is the heartbeat of wealth management. It gives investors a chance to align their wealth and their values for a positive impact while furthering the long-term goals they envision for themselves. However, traditionally, only a relatively small percentage of charitable assets available to investors are actually given in service of donor-advised funds, grant-making or establishing foundations. The majority of assets are invested for preservation and growth, and don’t always align with the investor’s overall mission-oriented goals. Because of this, philanthropists are asking: “Is there a way we can put our investments to work on behalf of our charitable mission as well?” The answer is a resounding yes. Not only are there many ways to view impact investing, but making a difference doesn’t have to mean sacrificing returns.

Our Philosophy – It’s All About You

The values of our clients are as unique as our clients themselves, and each philanthropic goal is equally deserving of a unique investment plan. At Whittier Trust, we’ve developed a process to help our private clients maintain the maximum flexibility necessary to handpick the investments right for them and their charitable giving vehicles. This includes: avoiding mutual funds, focusing on quality investments, measuring those investments against the clients’ prioritized ESG (Environmental, Social, Governance) factors, and customizing a portfolio of recommendations for careful consideration. Examples of our tailored ESG solutions include investments in impact-screened equities, program and mission related investments (PRI’s and MRIs), fixed income, venture capital and other private investments. By looking at companies through an ESG (or impact) lens, not only are you aligning your portfolio with your philanthropic values, but because you will be looking at investments that mitigate risks, reduce taxes, and ensure long-term sustainability, you will also be growing your assets (including those used for grant-making) over time.

Our Process

Thanks to the increased presence of ESG in the markets, we have also expanded our fundamental analysis to provide metrics that demonstrate the real impacts your investments are having as a result of our process. With decades of experience, a high-quality investment philosophy, and an eye towards principles of sustainability, we know that the best way to begin this process is by listening carefully to you. Once we understand your values and how you’d like to express them through your investments, we will build a uniquely tailored portfolio to align with these values and goals. Our traditional rigorous financial analysis, known for uncovering excellent private and public market opportunities, is complimented with a layer of diligence focusing on environmental, social and corporate governance considerations.

We give these considerations equally rigorous treatment. When looking at environmental factors, we analyze a company’s commitment to energy efficiencies, recycling, minimally invasive manufacturing processes, responsible sourcing for raw materials, supply chain sustainability and deference to natural resources and environmental effects. We pay attention to how a company treats their employees, measuring social responsibility through reported levels of satisfaction and low client and employee turnover. We also look at governance. Quality of leadership and management shows through in high scores on integrity, diversity, accountability to investors and community engagement.

Is Impact Investing Right For You?

Investors are at the forefront of corporate change. We can help you join their ranks to address issues like climate change, diversity, human rights and animal cruelty. It’s up to you to ultimately determine for yourself whether impact investing is right for your money and your mission. Whittier Trust Client Advisors are here for any questions you may have, and ready to show you how impact investing can be successfully integrated into  your investing strategy.

From Investments to Family Office to Trustee Services and more, we are your single-source solution.

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Donor-advised funds are remarkably flexible and versatile. Learn how many of our clients – whether or not they consider themselves to be philanthropic – are employing DAFs to minimize their income tax burden, reduce family conflict, structure their charitable giving for greater impact, diversify assets while avoiding capital gains tax, teach their children positive values and financial literacy and make managing their foundations less stressful. What impact might pending policy changes have on this increasingly popular planning tool? Whittier Trust’s Pegine Grayson (SVP/Philanthropic Advisor) will be joined by GHJ Advisors’ Rajpal Gibson (Senior Tax Manager and High Net Worth Practice Leader) for this interactive discussion.

Whittier Trust Company and The Whittier Trust Company of Nevada, Inc. are state-chartered trust companies, which are wholly owned by Whittier Holdings, Inc., a closely held holding company. All of said companies are referred to herein, individually and collectively, as “Whittier”. The accompanying materials are provided for informational purposes only and are not intended, and should not be construed, as investment, tax or legal advice. Please consult your own investment, legal and/or tax advisors in connection with financial decisions and before engaging in any financial transactions. These materials do not purport to be a complete statement of approaches, which may vary due to individual factors and circumstances. Although the information provided is carefully reviewed, Whittier makes no representations or warranties regarding the information provided and cannot be held responsible for any direct or incidental loss or damage resulting from applying any of the information provided. Past performance is no guarantee of future results and no investment or financial planning strategy can guarantee profit or protection against losses. These materials may not be reproduced or distributed without Whittier’s prior written consent.

From Investments to Family Office to Trustee Services and more, we are your single-source solution.

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Private philanthropy has always played a critical role in disaster relief efforts. While it certainly can’t and shouldn’t take the place of well-funded governmental aid programs, private donors have proven time and again to be more nimble and flexible, and their philanthropy can serve to help meet the immediate needs of those affected as they wait for the government to react. It can also fill in gaps not covered by governmental programs.

That said, it can be challenging for philanthropists and their charitable vehicles to know how best to help, especially when the factual landscape is shifting so quickly. Below are some suggestions you may find helpful as you begin to develop a strategy that works best for you.

1. Augment what you’re already doing for the organizations you already love

From our countless conversations with nonprofits, we can say without reservation that they are all struggling right now. The demand for services by health care, education and social service providers is spiking. At the same time, revenues are down: arts-related nonprofits have lost vital ticket sales revenue, and those that depend on sales from thrift stores or retail sales have seen that income vanish. Regardless of mission, all nonprofits are having to enable their staffs to work remotely and/or implement costly new sanitizing procedures.

Consider these ideas:

  • Relax requirements – excuse your organizations from the burden of submitting reports or full proposals for support.
  • Eliminate restrictions – if your current support is for a restricted program, let the organization know they can use your already-awarded funds for anything they need.
  • Suspend reporting requirements for a period of time.
  • Ask about particular COVID-19-related needs and consider making additional one-time grants to help keep them afloat without having to lay off staff, so they can remain in a position to continue carrying out their mission when the immediate crisis ends.

2. Support coordinated relief efforts by trusted agencies

  • Locally: Perhaps the best way to support response efforts in your own back yard is to contribute to relief funds set up by either your local community foundation or your city or county governments.1
    • The Mayor’s Fund (Los Angeles)
    • The Mayor’s COVID-19 Emergency Response Fund supports a variety of emergency response activities: medical equipment and protective gear, meal delivery for elderly, testing and housing for the homeless, and childcare for health care workers. The Angeleno Fund is providing direct and immediate financial assistance for individuals and families experiencing extreme financial hardship caused by the COVID-19 crisis.
    • California Community Foundation launched the COVID-19 LA County Response Fund to address the immediate and longer-term needs of our region’s most vulnerable residents. This fund will support community needs identified by CCF’s partners in health, housing, education and immigration, and will aid impacted individuals through CCF’s Pass It Along Fund.
    • Philanthropy CA (in partnership with Southern California Grantmakers & Northern California Grantmakers) has curated a comprehensive list of national, statewide and local efforts by category. Once you open the link, click on the “Response Funds” tab, and you can filter by geography, scope and targeted communities.
    • Great Public Schools Now, in partnership with several Los Angeles community organizations, has established a COVID-19 response fund. Donations will go directly to Los Angeles families to meet basic needs such as food, rent, medical care, childcare, gas, and transportation.
    • Many hospitals are setting up relief funds specific to Covid-19: See CDC Foundation Combat Coronavirus.
    • The American Red Cross has posted safety resources on their website as well as trusted guidance from both the County of Los Angeles Public Health Department and the CDC. The ARC-Los Angeles Region has already served over two million meals in partnership with the Los Angeles Unified School District. This operation will likely continue through the end of the school year. The Red Cross has also provided thousands of blankets to the City of Los Angeles for homeless citizens who are being sheltered in City recreation centers during the outbreak.
  • Nationally:
  • Internationally:
    • Via Charities Aid Foundation (CAF) America, donors can make tax-receipted, regulatory-compliant contributions to support the work of hospitals, community-based organizations, and other charities that are mobilizing around the world to provide support to those affected by COVID-19. On their website, you can browse the list of organizations vetted by CAF America that are working to provide relief on the ground.
    • The World Health Organization (WHO) is also leading and coordinating a global effort, supporting countries to prevent, detect, and respond to the pandemic. Donations here support WHO’s work to track and understand the spread of the virus; to ensure patients get the care they need and frontline workers get essential supplies and information; and to accelerate efforts to develop vaccines, tests, and treatments.

3. Peruse other helpful resources

1Please note that the examples included in this list are for the Los Angeles County area. For other regions, the best place to start is likely your local community foundation or the grantmaking association serving your area’s funders.

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Right now, the lifetime exemption for gifts and estates is the highest it has ever been—$11.58 million for individuals or a $23.16 million joint exemption for married people. But this number isn’t permanent and could change. That’s why financial advisors are saying it’s a smart idea to put vehicles in place, like trusts, to enable seamless lifetime gifting.

“Some people are waiting to do things based on how things land, politically, but that could leave them scrambling if things were to change,” said Rebecca Duguid, a senior vice president and client advisor at Whittier Trust. “The earlier you get the process started, the better.”

Having vehicles in place now can give you the maximum flexibility in terms of gifting to kids and grandkids — and can also help your children and grandkids learn how to be wise stewards of your wealth. That’s because, while “trust fund kid” has become a cliché, having access to a trust fund can help people in their twenties and thirties manage money effectively, especially when working in tandem with a financial or trust advisor.

Giving yourself time and space to answer these questions now and setting up effective trust vehicles for the future can also allow you the time to watch your children or grandkids enjoy and safeguard your wealth. “We want to pass our wealth down to the next generation, and hope they’ll do the same,” said Duguid. Here are some things to consider when you begin gifting to the next generation.

Ensure Your Heirs Have What They Need

One “easy” way to divide wealth is to create what is called a pot trust. In this scenario, Duguid explained, the money is in one trust, with equal access given to children to request distributions. A trustee will be named, and then, a distribution will be made if the trustee agrees to a request. Distributions can have provisions, such as health, maintenance, support, or education expenses. While this trust may seem “simple,” Duguid said that it could create fractures in families.

“Different children will have different needs, so family dynamics can be much easier to manage when you create separate trusts,” said Duguid.

It’s also smart to consider how you want the trust dispersed—and what makes the most sense for the family’s needs. “Every client does it differently, giving money to children at different ages. You have to consider at what ages your children are going to be able to manage and be good stewards of the wealth you are passing down,” said Duguid.

This type of trust can be a helpful way to guide adult children through milestones such as real estate purchases, marriage, and children’s educations—without running the risk that they will “blow through” the trust. There may also be trust setups that accommodate your legacy wishes, such as establishing a dynasty trust that can be accessed by heirs long after the lifetime of your original beneficiaries.

Consider Your Assets And Share Your Plan

A diverse portfolio of real estate holdings, businesses, and private assets can complicate lifetime gifting. That’s why it can be a good idea to work with an advisor who has deep trust experience to create multiple trusts based on your holdings and your financial wishes. For example, if you have a business or real estate holdings, you may consider establishing an intentionally defective grantor trust to hold assets. This can remove appreciated assets from your estate to pass along to your children while allowing gifts to grow, and the grantor pays the taxes.

“We have many families that own businesses, and they are trying to figure out the best way to gift the business, especially while the lifetime gift exemption is at an all-time high,” shared Duguid. One example of this type of arrangement, “Parents are in their seventies and are still heavily involved in the business and were able to set up an intentionally defective grantor trust.”

In this example, the kids are involved in the planning process, which can be helpful in keeping everyone involved on the same page. If you are planning to pass down a business or real estate holdings, it can be smart to speak with a professional to find out the best way to do so.

Lifetime Gifting Works Best With A Fiduciary

High-net-worth individuals know that wealth is a big responsibility—which is why Duguid said it is a smart idea to make sure your children and grandchildren have a fiduciary to guide them through financial moves.

The amount of interaction you or your heirs want with a wealth advisor is personal—and can change over a lifetime. “We have some relationships where our involvement is less while we have others where we guide them through life decisions such as buying a house and getting a prenup,” said Duguid.

Make Plans To Gift Today

Of course, you may not be ready to seed a lifetime gift into a trust. But the important thing, Duguid said, is to have vehicles in place, have your questions answered and have time and space to consider the psychological and financial implications of gifting during your lifetime. The decisions—who to choose as a trustee, how you want your assets distributed, distribution provisions—can also take time, conversations, and professional consultation. But making these moves now can save your loved ones money later.

“The last outcome you want is to have to pay estate tax because you did not take advantage of the lifetime gift exemption, that is currently at an all-time high and is anticipated to go down substantially” said Duguid.

Written in partnership with Forbes BrandVoice.

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WHY LIFETIME GIFTING SHOULD BE CENTRAL TO YOUR ESTATE PLAN

  1. Ensure Your Heirs Have What They Need
  2. Consider Your Assets and Share Your Plan
  3. Lifetime Gifting Works Best with a Fiduciary
  4. Make Plans to Gift Today

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When a child comes into the world, we spend ample time considering how to protect and prepare them for the life ahead. For most, creating a plan that incrementally saves for big ticket items like education, possible medical needs or celebratory events is part of every parent’s job.

As we anticipate the trajectory of their life, we must also consider the rapid pace of technology, changing industries and global events that impact our, and their, financial futures. We must factor in how costs will rise over the next 18 years.

Consider this: the cost of college has increased a whopping 213% since 1988 alone.

In 2017, CNN reported the price tag of a four-year bachelor’s degree today from a private non-profit college to be $104,400 (estimated by the College Board), assuming the student did not encounter any delays graduating.

But, we know all too well that many schools cost more than that.  That Harvard education? It now comes with a price tag of $70,000 per year. Assuming those costs stay fixed (and we know they won’t), a single degree will cost $270,320. Interested in Stanford? Try $67,000 for the 2018-19 school year.

That’s steep.

So, how can we make the right decisions now to help save tax dollars, and ensure financial stability?

Pay directly, when you can.

First, understand that it is always in one’s best interest to pay an educational institution directly. For a college or university, there are no limits on the amount of money that can be paid, and it’s considered a non-taxable event. For elementary and secondary schools, there is a $10,000 annual cap on amounts paid.

And while it’s considered the best case scenario to pay as much as possible upfront, no one knows what the future holds for any individual’s ability to pay directly.

So in that spirit, one of the most powerful tools for helping save for a child’s educational expenses is the 529 college savings plan.

A 529 behaves like an IRA in that it uses after tax dollars, which will never again be taxed as long as they are used for educational purposes.

Always considered a helpful tool, the 529 was greatly enriched with the 2017 passage of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

Here’s our strategic advice on how to make the 529 work for you.

  1. Open an account as soon as you can. The 529 structure is never held in a child’s name, which is beneficial for many reasons. First, it is not tied to their social security number or assets, so a parent may be able to supplement costs with financial aid and scholarships. Secondly, a grandparent can open the account as well as a parent, accounting for additional saving opportunities
  2. Front Load. 529 account holders (including grandparents) are allowed to max out contributions in the first year. Normally, each parent is allowed to contribute $15,000 per child, per year (for a two-parent household that means $30,000 annually). However, upon opening the account, households can contribute 5 times the maximum contribution. That means up to $150,000 in year one, and then letting it sit for five years with no further contributions. Starting in year six, and moving forward, account holders can revert back to the $15,000 per parent contribution on an annual basis.
  3. Let It Grow. That said, if you do front load, you are harnessing enormous earning potential over the course of a few decades as you wait for your investment to mature.
  4. Understand Your Options. The new tax law also enables families to use funds in the plan to pay for private elementary and high school, not just college expenses. So, should you need funds sooner, you are covered. It is good to note, however, that elementary and secondary school payments are capped at $10,000 per year.
  5. Beneficiaries Can Transfer. As long as you do not have children who will overlap in funding needs (such as children who would attend college in the same time period), once one child is done using the money, you can change the beneficiary from the first to the second child. Or, perhaps extend it to other family members or future generations, the choice is yours.
  6. Plans Can Change. It’s important to consider that your child may ultimately elect to attend state school, or go straight into business, instead of attending a four-year college or university. So, while having this savings account grants you peace of mind, you may not need the entire sum as once thought. Which is great because we always recommend…
  7. Thinking Long Term. If your investment grows beyond what is needed for an immediate family, you can also extend it to future generations.
  8. Consider Nevada. Whittier Trust’s Nevada Tax Advantage has plenty to offer, and in the case of education, a family may elect to establish an education trust and/or include other specific trust purposes to cover health, education, maintenance and support, which would allow several generations to reap the benefits over time.

Paying for a child or family member’s education is indeed one of the greatest ways to gift wealth. Thanks to recent Congressional action, it’s now much more beneficial.

Gifting Wealth Through Education

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The last few months of 2017 have been particularly trying. In addition to the omnipresent needs of people living in poverty and instability, our world has been shaken by massive hurricanes, devastating earthquakes, destructive wildfires, terrorism and mass shootings. As the year-end approaches and many of us begin to consider making charitable gifts, it can be overwhelming to decide which worthy causes to support.

First, identify what’s stopping you. Where do you get held up in the process of making a year-end donation? Is it the sheer number of needy causes that stops you in your tracks? Not sure how to make sure the charity will do something noble with your funds? Once you tune into the root cause(s) of your inertia, it becomes much simpler to remove one obstacle at a time.

Whittier Trust’s Philanthropic Services team has listed out a few tips to help you and your family get started.

1. Identify what you’d like to change or preserve in the world. What would you like to see more of? Less of? This can shine a light on the “cause” or “issue area” you’d like to support.

2. Determine if your issue area is broad or specific. For example, if you chose “quality education” do you really mean K-12? A more specific age range? Education of a particular style or philosophy? As specific and granular as you can get, you’ll find it easier to make a charitable gift that you feel good about.

3. Research charitable organizations addressing your concern. This doesn’t need to be time-consuming or challenging. Use Google to search for organizations doing what you want, in the area you want. Follow up with a search on https://www.guidestar.org to ensure the organization is a qualified 501(c)3 organization and is in good standing. Alternatively, you can call your local community foundation or the Philanthropic Services team at Whittier Trust.

4. Still not sure how much impact your gift will have? Give the organization a call. Although nonprofit leaders are stretched thin and might not get back to you right away, they love the opportunity to connect with prospective donors to show transparency and build a relationship with you.

5. Do you only want your contribution used for certain things? You have the right to designate your gift to a specific purpose. Just be clear about your wishes when making the gift and remember that the organization needs funds for day-to-day operations just as much as they need it for direct programs. It’s best to designate your funds to something they can actually use!

6. Have you found yourself shying away from a donation because you don’t want to get spammed with mass mailings and email campaigns? Simply note on your contribution form or in the memo of your check “Please omit me from all communications/mailings.” They may call you to find out why, but from then on should always respect your wishes.

7. Timing is everything. If you want to claim a charitable deduction for your year-end gift, the donation must be POSTMARKED or charged to your credit card by December 31st. Be sure that the thank you letter from the charity includes the correct date of your gift. Gifting appreciated, publicly-traded stock is also an excellent tax efficient way to donate!

Questions? Contact Whittier Trust Philanthropic Services at 626.441.5188

Investment and Wealth Management Services are provided by Whittier Trust Company and The Whittier Trust Company of Nevada, Inc. (referred to herein individually and collectively as “Whittier Trust”), state-chartered trust companies wholly owned by Whittier Holdings, Inc. (“WHI”), a closely held holding company. WHI may utilize the services of its subsidiary, Belridge Capital, LLC, an SEC registered investment advisor, to provide sub-advisory services for certain accounts and proprietary private fund investments.
This paper is provided for informational purposes only. The views expressed by Whittier Trust’s Chief Investment Officer are as of a particular point in time and are subject to change without notice. The information and opinions presented herein have been obtained from, or are based on, sources believed by Whittier Trust to be reliable, but Whittier Trust makes no representation as to their accuracy or completeness. Actual events or results may differ materially from those reflected or contemplated herein. Although the information provided is carefully reviewed, Whittier Trust cannot be held responsible for any direct or incidental loss resulting from applying any of the information provided. Company references are provided for illustrative purposes only and should not be construed as investment advice or a recommendation to purchase, sell or hold any security. Past performance is no guarantee of future results and no investment strategy can guarantee profit or protection against losses. These materials may not be reproduced or distributed without Whittier Trust’s prior written consent.
DECISIONS- MAKING THE MOST OF YEAR END GIVING

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